Stories Filed Under “U.S.-ROK relations”

Recent Events

The US-Korea Institute at SAIS presents

Direction of South Korea’s Foreign Policy:
MOON Jae-In’s Strategy for Making a Better
Alliance
with the Trump Administration

Wednesday, February 15, 2017
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
SAIS Rome Auditorium
1619 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20036

The US-Korea Institute at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) invites you to attend a discussion with Professor KIM Ki Jung, a policy advisor to Mr. MOON Jae-in, a leading candidate in the next presidential election in South Korea, on Mr. MOON’s strategy to strengthen the US-ROK Alliance with the Trump Administration.

For more information or to register for the event, click here.

Happening This Week

USKI-KNDU-INHA CIS Joint Symposium 2017

U.S. –Korea Alliance Under the Trump Administration

Wednesday, February 22, 2017
1:30 PM – 3:30 PM
SAIS Rome Auditorium
1619 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20036

This event is free and open to the public and press.
Click here to watch the the event live.

USKI-KNDU-INHA CIS Joint Symposium 2017

Wednesday, Feb 22, 2017 – USKI-KNDU-INHA CIS Joint Symposium 2017

An Information Based Strategy to Reduce North Korea’s Increasing Threat: Recommendations for ROK & U.S. Policy Makers

Commander Fredrick “Skip” Vincenzo, USN

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

“Deterrence works, until it doesn’t.”—Sir Lawrence Freedman

The United States’ current approach to North Korea does not fundamentally resolve the risks of its belligerent behavior nor halt the development of its nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles. As these capabilities are improved, there is greater potential that Kim Jong-un, the leader of North Korea—confident he can deter a regime-threatening reaction—will attempt a violent provocation to achieve political objectives but in doing so miscalculates and instead sparks a crisis which escalates disastrously. While the United States has contingency plans for a wide range of conflict scenarios, executing them would be extraordinarily costly—the military capabilities Pyongyang has now amassed would inflict catastrophic damage.

James Clapper, the U.S. Director of National Intelligence, has repeatedly warned that Pyongyang is “committed to developing a long-range, nuclear-armed missile that is capable of posing a direct threat to the United States…” and that “North Korea has already taken initial steps toward fielding this system…”1 With such a capability, Kim is attempting force the international community to accommodate him to avoid conflict. However, he could underestimate U.S. resolve, which in turn would ignite conflict. If the Kim regime falls, a nuclear-armed, fragmented military could strike the United States.

Click here to download the full report.

Remembering Amb. Stephen Bosworth

Ambassador Stephen Bosworth, 1939-2016. (Photo: Kaveh Sardari/USKI)

Ambassador Stephen Bosworth, 1939-2016. (Photo: Kaveh Sardari/USKI)

Ambassador Stephen Warren Bosworth died of pancreatic cancer in his home in Boston on Monday, January 4, 2016.

Stephen Bosworth was a career American diplomat and was chairman of the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and held an appointment as a Senior Fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He was also served as the Payne Lecturer at the Freeman Spogli Institute at Stanford University in 2014.

Ambassador Bosworth served as Dean of The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University from 2001-2013. His administration at Fletcher is credited with increasing the size of the Fletcher faculty and student body while securing the financial soundness of the school during a period of economic uncertainty. He oversaw the creation of new degree programs that have significantly expanded the scope of The Fletcher School’s teaching, research, and global outreach. During his tenure as Dean at the Fletcher School, Ambassador Bosworth also served President Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton as United States Special Representative for North Korea Policy from 2009 to 2011.

“Stephen Bosworth was among the best diplomats of his generation. A consummate professional and a student of history, he managed American foreign policy skillfully at critical junctures and left an indelible imprint on America’s policy toward Asia,” said Vali Nasr, dean of Johns Hopkins SAIS, “He was a transformational dean at the Fletcher School at Tufts University where he oversaw development of new programs. Insightful, kind and considerate, he was a great influence on friends and colleagues and generations of students who studied international affairs.”

read more …

USKI Policy Brief: “The Korean Wave in American Politics”

With growing confidence in their grassroots power, Korean Americans are now networking further to strengthen their political influence through enlightening themselves about voting rights, mobilizing the community for major elections, and encouraging the next generation to be more visible and active in Washington’s political arena.

USKI Policy Brief: "The Korean Wave in American Politics,” by Eunjung Lim & Dennis P. Halpin (9/11/15)SAIS Lecturer Eunjung Lim and USKI Visiting Scholar Dennis Halpin review the accomplishments and analyze the rising influence of the Korean American community in US domestic politics.

Download the USKI Policy Brief: “The Korean Wave in American Politics,” by Eunjung Lim and Dennis P. Halpin.

A shorter version of this brief was originally published as on op-ed in the Korea Times on September 8, 2015. Read it here.

Dr. Eunjung Lim is currently a lecturer for Korea Studies at School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University. Her research interests include comparative studies on democracy and local politics. She has been researching on Korean Americans’ grassroots movement as well.

Dennis P. Halpin, a former US consul in Busan and Asian affairs advisor to the House Foreign Affairs Committee, is a visiting scholar at the US-Korea Institute and an adviser to the Poblete Analysis Group.

Seeking Program & Research Interns

The US-Korea Institute at SAIS is seeking program and research interns for immediate hire. Multiple positions are open, duties will vary. Current areas of research include: North Korea political, economic, and social development, North Korean WMD issues, US-ROK nuclear cooperation, US-ROK cooperation in Southeast Asia, US-ROK cooperation nuclear security, US foreign policy to both Koreas, energy security cooperation in Northeast Asia, ROK renewable energy policies, and more. Candidates with a background in security and Asia issues preferred for immediate open positions.

Interns generally are asked to work on a variety of tasks including research assistance, event attendance and reporting, logistical support for events and projects, and other things as necessary. They may work with USKI staff and/or Visiting Scholars on various projects.

Successful candidates should have an interest in Korea and/or East Asia policy and be at least a sophomore in college or higher; graduate students and post-grads are encouraged to apply. Foreign language skills are a plus, but not necessary. Strong writing and editing skillls are preferred. Must be able to multitask, prioritize, meet deadlines, and work well both independently and in small groups.

USKI internships are unpaid and interns are expected to work at least 4 days a week.

To apply, please email cover letter, resume and short writing sample to Michelle Kae, Research Assistant at mkae1@jhu.edu. Only those chosen for interview will be contacted. No phone calls please.