Stories Filed Under “Social Issues”

Upcoming Events at USKI

The U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins SAIS presents

Lost and Found in Uzbekistan:

The Korean Story

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

6:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Reception beginning at 6:00 PM

Johns Hopkins SAIS, Rome Auditorium

1619 Massachusetts Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20036

Featuring: Victoria Kim, Beijing-based writer and multimedia producer

Moderated by: Jenny Town, Assistant Director, US-Korea Institute at SAIS

Click here for more information and to RSVP

Unfinished Apologies: Imperial Japan’s Sex Slaves of Wartime Asia

The U.S.-Korea Institute at SAIS and Asia Policy Point present

Unfinished Apologies:

Imperial Japan’s Sex Slaves of Wartime Asia

March 1, 2016
9:00 AM – 3:00 PM
Kenney Auditorium
1740 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20036

The US-Korea Institute at SAIS and Asia Policy Point invite you to attend a discussion on the unexamined and unresolved history of Imperial Japan’s system of sex slavery in wartime Asia. The panels will provide an overview of how the system came to be and how it was managed, discuss new research on the non-Korean Comfort Women, and bring the legacy of the Comfort Women system into contemporary understandings of conflict resolution and violence against women in warfare settings.

Panel 1: Framing the Comfort Women History – Japanese Comfort Women and their Antecedents

  • Caroline Norma, lecturer in the Master of Translating and Interpreting degree in RMIT’s School of Global, Urban and Social Studies, Melbourne, Australia
  • Discussant: Katharine H.S. Moon, SK-Korea Foundation Chair in Korea Studies and senior fellow at the Brookings Center for East Asia Policy Studies

Panel 2: The Comfort Women of Japan’s Occupied Asia 

  • Griselda Molemans, Dutch researcher and investigative journalist, founder of the Task Force for Dutch Indies War Reparations (Dutch acronym: TFIR; Task Force Indisch Rechtsherstel)
  • Hilde Janssen, Dutch Journalist and author Schaamte en Onschuld[Shame and Innocent] and Troostmeisjes/Comfort Women
  • Peipei Qiu, Professor of Chinese and Japanese on the Louise Boyd Dale and Alfred Lichtenstein Chair, Vassar College
  • Evelina Galang, Professor of English, University of Miami
  • Caroline Norma, RMIT, Melbourne, Australia
  • Moderator: Yukiko Hanawa, Department of East Asian Studies, New York University

Keynote: Women in warfare, how far have we come?

  • Taina Bien-Aimé, Executive Director, Coalition Against Trafficking in Women

Book signing with authors:

 Please RSVP here: 

http://uskoreainstitute.org/events/unfinishedapologies/

The event will be webcast here.

Unfinished Apologies: Imperial Japan’s Sex Slaves of Wartime Asia

Tuesday, Mar 1, 2016 – Unfinished Apologies: Imperial Japan’s Sex Slaves of Wartime Asia

Gender, Work, and Family in South Korea

The US-Korea Institute at SAIS presents

Gender, Work, and Family in South Korea

February 17, 2016
10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Rome Auditorium
1619 Massachusetts Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20036

The US-Korea Institute the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies invites you to attend a discussion on gender, work and family in South Korea. The panel will provide an overview of gender research on South Korea as well as presentations of in-depth case studies on transnational parenting focused on elite education and gendered politics in the South Korean labor movement.

With presentations from:

Miliann Kang,  Associate Professor and Graduate Program Director,
Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies, Sociology and Asian/Asian American Studies, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Gender Inequality and Feminist Research in South Korea

Juyeon Park, Ph.D. student, Sociology, University of Massachusetts,  Amherst
Who Draws the Big Picture? Gendered Intensive Parenting for Korean Students at US Elite Colleges 

Youngju Seo, Ph.D. student, Sociology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
The Politics of Gender and Labor in the South Korean Labor Movement from 1970 to the Present

 

 Read Bios and Paper Descriptions

Video recording available here:

Gender, Work, and Family in South Korea

Wednesday, Feb 17, 2016 – Gender, Work, and Family in South Korea

Film Screening: The Last Tear

The U.S.-Korea Institute at SAIS and Fading Away LLC present

The last tear image

Saturday, August 15, 2015
1:00pm-4:00pm

The United States Navy Memorial
701 Pennsylvania Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20004

The U.S.-Korea Institute and Fading Away LLC invite you to the debut film screening of Director Christopher H.K. Lee’s latest documentary, “The Last Tear.” The screening will be followed by Q&A with the producer and a reception.

1:00 Opening remarks
1:15  Film screening
2:15  Q&A with director
2:45  Reception

The screening is free and open to the public. Please RSVP here.

About the film:

 

TheLastTear_poster_Navy02Sexual violence against women has accompanied almost every large-scale conflict, yet most of its victims are silenced. One such sad episode is that of the “comfort women,” or more accurately, the estimated 200,000 women who were recruited to sexually serve the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II. As part of this immense system, many young women from all over Japan’s occupied territories in Asia were forced into service where they faced rape, torture and extreme violence at military camps, euphemistically termed “comfort stations.”

Since the early 1990s, the testimonies of these women shocked the world, and were eventually taken up as a serious human rights issue by the United Nations, a host of governments, and numerous independent NGOs. Taking a different approach, we aimed to listen to and gauge the true feelings of some of the few remaining survivors, believing that the sea of mass media and politics is largely drowning their voices out. We sought to hear their true wishes.

As part of our Fading Away documentary series, we hoped to give a voice to these women and search for a form of healing. We traveled thousands of miles to visit the historical locations and met with the some of few remaining survivors. Along the way, we became witnesses to the scars left on their bodies and souls.  Our journey brought us to Japan, Korea, China and Taipei to meet with several experts, museums and NGOs. Our team gained great insight on this controversial issue that is still widely unknown to the rest of the world.

Now into their 80s and 90s, these women are becoming weaker day by day and we believe that such traces of painful memories and tragic stories may never be healed. But by remembering them and embracing them, we will provide a step towards their ultimate closure.

Our film’s purpose is to share the emotions of the past and to connect our generations in a more personal and humanistic way. Through understanding the faults of the past, we allow them to never be erased, and prevent them from happening again.

Movie website: The Last Tear

About the director:

Christopher H.K. Lee is an award-winning filmmaker/writer/publisher and media artist. He has over 27 years of multi-cultural and diverse industry experience in the fields of architecture, interactive media, visual effects and animations as a director/producer and over ten years of lecturing experience at colleges in both South Korea and the U.S.  Mr. Lee has produced many feature and short films, including several others that raise awareness of Korean history, culture and current affairs titled “I am Grace,” “Rescued by Fate,” and “Fading Away.”

 

fading away logo

Asian Women in Leadership: A conversation with Florence Lowe-Lee and Jaehyang So

The U.S.-Korea Institute at SAIS and the Sejong Society of Washington, D.C. proudly present
a roundtable conversation on Asian women in leadership.

Featuring:
Florence Lowe-Lee, President and Founder of the Global America Business Institute (GABI)
Jaehyang So, Director of Trust Funds and Partnerships at the World Bank

They will share with us their distinguished professional journey as well as any cultural barriers and leadership challenges they faced in their career.  This will be an opportunity to hear frank advice in their respective field in international consulting and international development.

Tuesday, May 21, 2015
6:00-7:30PM
Rome Building, Room 812
1619 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington, DC 20036

Please RSVP here.

Light dinner will be served from 6:00-6:30 PM.  The session will begin sharply at 6:30 PM.


Ms. Florence Lowe-Lee is Founder and President of the Global America Business Institute (GABI) in Washington, DC. As President of GABI, she oversees the organization’s fellowship programs and education/outreach activities on nuclear and renewable energy issues. Since its establishment in May 2011, GABI has sought to inform policy circles in Washington, DC on various policy-relevant energy topics, with a focus on Korea’s energy situation, international civil nuclear cooperation, renewable energy R&D collaboration, and nuclear fuel cycle issues.

Previously, Ms. Lowe-Lee served as the Treasurer and Director of Finance and Publications at the Korea Economic Institute (KEI) for 19 years. At KEI, she was frequently interviewed by the U.S. and Korean media on current issues concerning U.S.-Korea bilateral relations. Ms. Lowe-Lee also organized and supervised programs involving senior officials from Korea and the United States, as well as visits by Korean government officials and National Assembly members.  She also worked as Deputy Director of Operations for the Massachusetts Senate Ways and Means Committee, where she participated in the senior committee decision-making process.

Ms. Lowe-Lee holds a B.A. in Neuroscience from Mount Holyoke College and received an M.A. in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from Columbia University.

 

Ms. Jaehyang So is the Director, Trust Funds and Partnerships at the World Bank. A Korean national, Ms. So joined the World Bank in 1992 as a Young Professional. She has worked throughout World Bank’s front line and corporate units focusing on privatization of utilities, financial and corporate restructuring of state owned enterprises, and infrastructure operations in East Asia, South Asia, Eastern and Central Asia, and Africa. Prior to her current position, Ms. So was the Manager of the Water and Sanitation Program (WSP), one of the longest running global partnership programs of the World Bank, where she led the development and implementation of the program’s results management and monitoring systems and significantly leveraged the financial mobilization efforts and resources of the program. Ms. So has also served in selected corporate assignments throughout her career, including Adviser to the Managing Director, supporting the World Bank Group’s strategy, budget, and resource mobilization efforts. Prior to the World Bank, Ms. So was a corporate strategy consultant at Monitor Company, a management consultancy in Cambridge, Massachusetts, advising Fortune 100 level companies.