Stories Filed Under “Publications”

Young Professionals Paper Series (YPPS)

The U.S.-Korea Institute at SAIS and the Sejong Society of Washington, DC are pleased to announce the inaugural publication of the Young Professionals Paper Series (YPPS). Launched under the Research Directorate of the Sejong Society, YPPS is an initiative designed to generate original policy literature by young professionals and graduate students on issues relating to the Korean peninsula. The program provided participants with the unique opportunity to be mentored by established Korea policy experts throughout the research and writing process, and to ultimately be published in cooperation with the U.S.-Korea Institute at SAIS.

To download the publication and learn more about YPPS, visit our Young Professionals Paper Series page.

USKI Policy Brief: “Abe Plays the North Korea Card”

Ironically, given the current political tensions in the region, Abe could end up having his first bilateral East Asian
summit with none other than North Korea’s Kim Jong Un—neither of whom have yet been invited to Beijing, though for entirely different reasons. ~ Dennis P. Halpin

 

With the recent round of Japan-North Korea informal talks in China last weekend and reported hopes for another round of formal bilateral negotiations in the near future, Dennis P. Halpin examines the possible motivations driving this seeming rapprochement.

Download the USKI Policy Brief: “Abe Plays the North Korea Card,” by Dennis P. Halpin.

Dennis P. Halpin is currently a visiting scholar at the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). He served as a Peace Corps volunteer in South Korea, U.S. consul in Pusan, and a House Foreign Affairs Committee staff member for over twelve years. 

Report Release: “Cell Phones in North Korea,” by Yonho Kim

The US-Korea Institute at SAIS and Voice of America announces the release of its latest report, “Cell Phones in North Korea: Has North Korea Entered the Telecommunications Revolution?” by Yonho Kim.

In this USKI-VOA report, Kim takes a closer look at the trends and implications of the cell phone boom in North Korea. His research examines such questions as: Who owns North Korean cell phones? How are cell phones obtained? How are subscriber plans set up? How are North Koreans using their cell phones? How have cell phones changed social norms?

Kim also delves deeper into the business side of the equation, examining Koryolink’s business structure in greater detail and what this really means for the Egyptian partner, Orascom, in terms of profitability and sustainability in North Korea.

Download the USKI-VOA report, “Cell Phones in North Korea: Has North Korea Entered the Telecommunications Revolution?” by Yonho Kim.

Find video archive of the report launch and panel discussion on Telecommunications and Technology in North Korea, featuring Yonho Kim, Alexandre Mansourov (US-Korea Institute at SAIS) and Sascha Meinrath (Open Technology Institute), moderated by Jae Ku (Director, US-Korea Institute at SAIS) here.

Has North Korea Entered the Telecommunications Revolution?

On Thursday, March 6, the US-Korea Institute at SAIS and Voice of America will launch the report, “Cell Phones in North Korea: Has North Korea Entered the Telecommunications Revolution?” by Voice of America reporter, Yonho Kim. Mr. Kim will present key findings from his research, which includes the influence of cell phones on social trends and economy in North Korea.

The panel also features two distinguished discussants, Alexandre Mansourov (US-Korea Institute at SAIS) and Sascha Meinrath (New America Foundation, Open Technology Institute), who will provide further insights into technical and regional uses of telecommunications and information technology.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited, RSVP is required.

Live webcast of this event can be viewed at http://webcast.jhu.edu/Mediasite/Play/c63e47afe50f400eb9bce84a5896e58e1d.

Thursday, March 6, 2014
9:00 am – 10:30 am
Bernstein-Offit Building, Room 500
1717 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20036
RSVP HERE

Report Release: “Nuclear Security: Seoul, the Netherlands, and Beyond”

The U.S.-Korea Institute at SAIS announces the release of its latest report, “Nuclear Security: Seoul, the Netherlands, and Beyond,” by Kenneth N. Luongo and Michelle Cann. This report is based on discussions from a workshop under the same name that was held in September 2012 and sponsored by the U.S.-Korea Institute at SAIS, the Partnership for Global Security, and the International Institute for Strategic Studies as part of an ongoing dialogue on nuclear security governance.

The report draws on major strands of the discussions put forward at that workshop and provides recommendations in key issue areas: the NSS process; technical and policy initiatives within the NSS; emerging economies and the Non-Aligned Movement; building cooperation between industry, experts and government; the nuclear security/safety interface; innovating global nuclear security governance; and maintaining political momentum. It examines the accomplishments and shortcomings of the NSS process to date and looks ahead to the challenges and opportunities facing the 2014 and 2016 summits and beyond.

This report was made possible with generous support from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. For more information or to download the Executive Summary and full report, click here.

MacArthur Document Reports Imperial Japanese Military’s “Sanction” of Comfort Women Brothels

“An August 1, 2013 editorial in the Yomiuri Shimbun, Japan’s largest circulation daily, carried the title “Comfort Women Allegations Distort Japanese History.” The greatest distortion here is the amnesia of an influential portion of Japanese society in addressing World War II history.” ~ Dennis P. Halpin 

 

The Yomiuri Shimbun recently published a controversial editorial that challenged the characterization of comfort women as “sex slaves,” and suggested that such labels were historically inaccurate. It noted that the Japanese government could not find official documents proving that the women were recruited by force.

Dennis P. Halpin, former House Foreign Relations Committee staff member and current Visiting Scholar at the US-Korea Institute at SAIS, examines the 1945 report, “Amenities in the Japanese Armed Forces,” published by command of General MacArthur (declassified in 1992) and compiled by the Allied Translator and Interpreter Section (ATIS) of the Supreme Commander for the Allied Forces (SCAP), which refutes the Japanese government’s claims.

Download USKI Policy Brief “MacArthur Document Reports Imperial Japanese Military’s “Sanction” of Comfort Women Brothels,” by Dennis P. Halpin.

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The Forgotten War’s POW Saint

“Father Kapaun has been called a shepherd in combat boots…Today we bestow another title on him—recipient of our nation’s highest military decoration.” ~ President Barack Obama at the Medal of Honor ceremony for Father Emil J. Kapaun (April 11, 2013)

On the 60th anniversary of the end of the Korean War, Dennis P. Halpin, former House Foreign Relations Committee staff member and current Visiting Scholar at the US-Korea Institute at SAIS, takes a moment to remember the work of Father Emil J. Kapaun, a U.S. Army chaplain who was captured during the Korean War and whose ministry to his fellow POWs has been characterized as “saintly.” He also reflects on the estimated 500 POWs believed to remain alive inside North Korea, in violation of the Armistice-linked exchange agreements: Big Switch and Little Switch.

Download USKI Policy Brief “The Forgotten War’s POW Saint” by Dennis P. Halpin.

Dennis P. Halpin is currently a visiting scholar at the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). He served as a Peace Corps volunteer in South Korea, U.S. consul in Pusan, and a House Foreign Affairs Committee staff member for over twelve years.