Stories Filed Under “Inter-Korean Politics”

Remembering Amb. Stephen Bosworth

Ambassador Stephen Bosworth, 1939-2016. (Photo: Kaveh Sardari/USKI)

Ambassador Stephen Bosworth, 1939-2016. (Photo: Kaveh Sardari/USKI)

Ambassador Stephen Warren Bosworth died of pancreatic cancer in his home in Boston on Monday, January 4, 2016.

Stephen Bosworth was a career American diplomat and was chairman of the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and held an appointment as a Senior Fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He was also served as the Payne Lecturer at the Freeman Spogli Institute at Stanford University in 2014.

Ambassador Bosworth served as Dean of The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University from 2001-2013. His administration at Fletcher is credited with increasing the size of the Fletcher faculty and student body while securing the financial soundness of the school during a period of economic uncertainty. He oversaw the creation of new degree programs that have significantly expanded the scope of The Fletcher School’s teaching, research, and global outreach. During his tenure as Dean at the Fletcher School, Ambassador Bosworth also served President Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton as United States Special Representative for North Korea Policy from 2009 to 2011.

“Stephen Bosworth was among the best diplomats of his generation. A consummate professional and a student of history, he managed American foreign policy skillfully at critical junctures and left an indelible imprint on America’s policy toward Asia,” said Vali Nasr, dean of Johns Hopkins SAIS, “He was a transformational dean at the Fletcher School at Tufts University where he oversaw development of new programs. Insightful, kind and considerate, he was a great influence on friends and colleagues and generations of students who studied international affairs.”

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2014 SAIS U.S.-Korea Yearbook

Yearbook cover 2014The 2014 Edition of the SAIS U.S.-Korea Yearbook analyzes important developments in North and South Korea that characterized their relations in that year. Each paper was written by a SAIS student from the course, “Korea’s Economic Development,” offered in the 2014 fall semester. Their insights were based on extensive reading and study as well as on numerous interviews conducted with government officials, scholars, NGO workers, academics and private sector experts both in Washington and Seoul.

Student authors featured: Alin Horj, Ju Hyung Kim, Kendrick Kuo, Jagabanta Ningthoujam, Kyu Seok Shim, and Mario Vanella.

Read more and download the full report here: 2014 SAIS US-Korea Yearbook

Learn more about the Korea Studies Program at SAIS.

Changing Politics and Economy in North Korea

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Recent developments on the Korean peninsula, including last month’s “25 August Agreement,” provide a new window of opportunity for North-South cooperation. What are the political and economic dynamics in North Korea that made this agreement possible? What policy options exist for the United States in response to these new developments?

Please join the U.S.-Korea Institute at SAIS and the Institute for Peace and Unification Studies at Seoul National University for a discussion on changing politics and economy in North Korea, and a look at the future of the Korean peninsula.

September 25, 2015
1:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Kenney Auditorium
1740 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20036

Keynote Speakers:

Amb. Joseph DETRANI, President, Intelligence and National Security Alliance
Dr. Young-Kwan YOON, Professor, Seoul National University; Former Foreign Minister, Korea

Session I: Kim Jong Un’s Leadership and North Korea’s External Policy

Moderator:     Dr. Myoung-Kyu PARK, Director, Institute for Peace and Unification Studies, Seoul National University, Korea
Speakers: Dr. Byung-Yeon KIM, Deputy Director, Institute for Peace and Unification Studies, Seoul National University, Korea
Dr. Philo KIM, Professor, Institute for Peace and Unification Studies, Seoul National University, Korea
Discussants: Bradley BABSON, Chairman, DPRK Economic Forum, U.S.-Korea Institute, SAIS
Alexandre MANSOUROV, Adjunct Professor, SAIS

Session II: U.S. Policy Towards the Korean Peninsula

Moderator:   Joel WIT,  Senior Fellow, U.S.-Korea Institute, SAIS
Speakers:   Frank JANNUZI,  President,  Maureen and Mike Mansfield Foundation
Dan BLUMENTHAL, Director, Asian Studies, American Enterprise Institute
Discussants: Amb. Joseph DETRANI, President, Intelligence and National Security Alliance
Dr. Young-Kwan YOON, Professor, Seoul National University; Former Foreign Minister, Korea


Full agenda here: 9.25 Agenda-Final

Please RSVP here by September 23.  Event will also be webcast HERE

Solutions to Potential Challenges in a Unified Korean Peninsula: A Simulation

KASM, Sejong,  USKI 2

The U.S-Korea Institute at SAIS, the Sejong Society of Washington, DC , and the Korean American Sharing Movement (KASM) invite you to participate in a unique opportunity to engage with North Korean defector students. The students currently attend universities in South Korea and are visiting Washington, D.C. to participate in the 2015 Washington Leadership Program organized by KASM.

This simulation assumes reunification has already occurred on the Korean Peninsula. Sejong Society and KASM participants will be divided into five groups representing a specific issue within a unified Korean government: Education, Internal Security, Foreign Affairs, Economic Development, and Domestic Politics. Each group will be responsible for identifying various problems and challenges that a unified government might encounter, propose solutions, and present their final ideas to all participants. In the RSVP form below, please indicate your two preferred groups.

This event will allow participants to experience first-hand the unique challenges involved in building a new society through integration and careful planning, and to learn strategies for building consensus.We encourage innovative thinking in developing solutions to potential challenges in a post-reunification scenario.

Friday, July 10th
6:00 – 8:30 p.m.
Room 500
Bernstein-Offit Building,
Johns Hopkins SAIS  

1717 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Washington, D.C. 20003

Light dinner will be served 6:00 – 6:30 p.m.

Please RSVP here: http://uskoreainstitute.org/events/solutions/

Communications Internships

The US-Korea Institute at SAIS is currently seeking 1-2 Communications interns. Tasks will include such activities as web content management/updates (multiple websites), social media management, media tracking, writing media advisories and event briefs, email newsletter management, event material preparation, and more.

A successful candidate should have superior writing and editing skills (in English), some copywriting experience a plus, with an eye for design, and should have some experience in the following programs: Adobe Photoshop, InDesign and Illustrator; WordPress (or other web content management systems); social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn (forums).

USKI internships are unpaid and interns are expected to work at least 4 days a week.

To apply, please email cover letter, resume and short writing sample to Jenny Town, Assistant Director at jtown2@jhu.edu. Only those chosen for interview will be contacted. No phone calls please.

Summer Program & Research Internships

The US-Korea Institute at SAIS is currently seeking program and research interns. Multiple positions are open and duties will vary. Some current areas of research include: North Korea political, economic, and social development, North Korean WMD issues, US-ROK nuclear cooperation, US-ROK cooperation in Southeast Asia, US-ROK cooperation nuclear security, US foreign policy to both Koreas, energy security cooperation in Northeast Asia, ROK renewable energy policies, and more.

Interns generally are asked to do a variety of tasks including research assistance, event attendance and reporting, logistical support for events and projects, and other things as necessary. They may work with USKI staff and/or Visiting Scholars on various projects.

Successful candidates should have an interest in Korea and/or East Asia policy and be at least a sophomore in college or higher; graduate students and post-grads are encouraged to apply. Foreign language skills are a plus, but not necessary. Strong writing and editing skillls are preferred. Must be able to multitask, prioitize, meet deadlines, and work well both independently and in small groups.

USKI internships are unpaid and interns are expected to work at least 4 days a week.

To apply, please email cover letter, resume and short writing sample to Jenny Town, Assistant Director at jtown2@jhu.edu. Only those chosen for interview will be contacted. No phone calls please.

Book Launch: The Two Koreas (Revised & Updated)

The US-Korea Institute at SAIS invites you to join us for the DC book launch for the revised edition of The Two Koreas: A Contemporary History. Korea uber-analyst and author Robert Carlin discusses the re-release of what many consider the foremost book on modern Korea, Don Oberdorfer’s The Two Koreas. Carlin wrote the updated foreward, bringing this arresting publication, loved by university students, business leaders and public alike, to a new generation of readers. Carlin will discuss the changes on the Korean Peninsula since the publication’s initial release, the publication’s continued relevance, and his labor of love saluting Van Fleet awardee and famed journalist Obderdorfer.

Book signing and reception to follow discussion. Copies of the book will be available for purchase from Politics & Prose. This event is free and open to the public.

Thursday, December 12, 2013
6:00 – 7:30 pm
Bernstein-Offit Building, Room 500
1717 Massachusetts Ave, NW
Washington, DC
PLEASE RSVP HERE.