Stories Filed Under “China”

Myanmar in a Regional Context

Monday, Sep 28, 2015 – Myanmar in a Regional Context

Young Researchers Symposium

COAA

The U.S.-Korea Institute and the Council on Asian Affairs present its 2015

Young Researchers Symposium

Please join us for three student presentations centered around issues in Northeast Asia, followed by Q&A and light refreshments.

Thursday, July 30, 2015
4:00-5:30PM
Kenney Auditorium
1740 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20036

With a keynote address from
Eunjung Lim,  Lecturer, Korea Studies
Johns Hopkins University, School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS)

and presentations by
Brian Chao, University of Pennsylvania; Wikistrat Inc.
“This Land is Your Land, This Land is My Land: Territorial Disputes and the Meanings of China”

Jonathan Corrado, Georgetown University; DailyNK
“North Korea: Pathways to Market Liberalization”

Caitlin Flessate, Korea Economic Institute
“Emerging into Sunlight: Changing Gender Concepts for Korean Women from 1880s – 1930s”

Please RSVP herehttp://uskoreainstitute.org/events/symposium/

Young Researchers Symposium

Thursday, Jul 30, 2015 – Young Researchers Symposium

Understanding Sexual Violence in Conflict: Regional Views of the Comfort Women Legacy

Featuring:

Shu-Hua Kang | Executive Director, Taipei Women’s Rescue Foundation

Mina Watanabe | Secretary General, Women’s Active Museum on War and Peace

 Bonnie Oh| (Moderating) Distinguished Prof of Korean Studies (Retired),
Georgetown University
 

Thursday, March 12
10:00AM – 12:00 PM
Rome Auditorium
1619 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington, DC 20036

 Please join the U.S.-Korea Institute at SAIS and Asia Policy Point in commemorating International Women’s Day this month with a discussion by two spokeswomen for the survivors of sexual slavery.  Ms. Mina Watanabe and Ms. Shu-Hua Kang have devoted their careers to the care of and advocacy for victims of sexual violence and trafficking in Asia, and will be in Washington after presenting at the 59th session of the Commission on the Status of Women at the United Nations in New York.

Shu-Hua KANG is Executive Director of the Taipei Women’s Rescue Foundation (TWRF). TWRF was established in 1987 by a group of lawyers, scholars, and social workers to fight on the behalf of girls illegally forced into prostitution. In her 9 years at TWRF, she has devoted herself to promoting awareness about institutionalized sexual slavery by the Japanese military during WWII (“comfort women”), as well as to the prevention of gender violence in Taiwan. She is the executive producer of Song of the Reed, a documentary depicting the stories of Taiwanese “comfort women” survivors, as well as the chief editor of the book The Reason to be Strong, which shares the recovery processes of these survivors. She is currently leading a team in preparing for a women’s rights museum in the memory of Taiwanese “comfort women.”  http://www.twrf.org.tw/

 

Mina WATANABE is Secretary General of the Women’s Active Museum on War and Peace (WAM) based in Tokyo, which focuses on violence against women in conflict situations including military sexual slavery during the Second World War (the “comfort women”). Founded in 2005, WAM was a recipient of the Catholic Pax Christi’s International Peace Award in 2007. She has worked in women’s NGOs and parliamentarians’ offices with a focus on women’s rights, and was actively involved in The Women’s International War Crimes Tribunal for the Trial of Japan’s Military Sexual Slavery held in Tokyo in 2000.  http://wampeace.org/en/

 

 Please RSVP here

This event will be webcast HERE.

Understanding Sexual Violence in Conflict: Regional Views of the Comfort Women Legacy

Thursday, Mar 12, 2015 – Understanding Sexual Violence in Conflict: Regional Views of the Comfort Women Legacy

“The ABCs of North Korea’s SEZs,” by Andray Abrahamian

Cover of "The ABCs of North Korea's SEZs," by Andray AbrahamianIn recent years, North Korea has put greater emphasis on economic growth, resuming economic experimentation and putting in place new measures to try to attract foreign investment. More and more, Pyongyang seems to be placing its bets on developing Special Economic Zones (SEZs) to serve as the main engine of that desired growth. While an SEZ strategy is hardly new for the North, the establishment of new SEZ laws and specialized zone development plans seem to indicate a better understanding of what it takes to attract foreign investors.

In this new USKI Report, Andray Abrahamian, Executive Director of Choson Exchange, examines the political and economic drivers of North Korea’s SEZ development policy and its established zones, and spotlights SEZs with the greatest growth potential. Abrahamian also draws insight from site visits and discussions with North Korean officials, businesspersons and academics to further explore the limitations, challenges and opportunities for North Korea’s new and planned SEZs.

Download the USKI Report, “The ABCs of North Korea’s SEZs,” by Andray Abrahamian.

Seeking Program & Research Interns

The US-Korea Institute at SAIS is seeking program and research interns for immediate hire and for the upcoming spring semester. Multiple positions are open, duties will vary. Current areas of research include: North Korea political, economic, and social development, North Korean WMD issues, US-ROK nuclear cooperation, US-ROK cooperation in Southeast Asia, US-ROK cooperation nuclear security, US foreign policy to both Koreas, energy security cooperation in Northeast Asia, ROK renewable energy policies, and more. Candidates with a background in security and Asia issues preferred for immediate open positions.

Interns generally are asked to do a variety of tasks including research assistance, event attendance and reporting, logistical support for events and projects, and other things as necessary. They may work with USKI staff and/or Visiting Scholars on various projects.

Successful candidates should have an interest in Korea and/or East Asia policy and be at least a sophomore in college or higher; graduate students and post-grads are encouraged to apply. Foreign language skills are a plus, but not necessary. Strong writing and editing skillls are preferred. Must be able to multitask, prioritize, meet deadlines, and work well both independently and in small groups.

USKI internships are unpaid and interns are expected to work at least 4 days a week.

To apply, please email cover letter, resume and short writing sample to Jenny Town, Assistant Director at jtown2@jhu.edu. Only those chosen for interview will be contacted. No phone calls please.