Alexander Bellah reviews contemporary Sino-Korean relations to assess how they have been affected by core concerns related to security, economy, and values. Bellah’s analysis concludes with a discussion of future events that might suggest a change in Korea’s course, such as its willingness to join security initiatives fiercely opposed by China, like ballistic missile defense, or a closer trilateral security relationship with Japan and the U.S. that is meant to deter Chinese revanchism.

Read “Uncertainty in the Shadow of a Rising China,” by Alexander Bellah.

Alexander Bellah is a second-year M.A. student at SAIS, concentrating in China Studies. Before receiving his undergraduate degree in International Relations and Economics at the College of William and Mary, Alex served as a Korean linguist in the U.S. Air Force. From his experience working and studying in South Korea, he developed an interest in broader Northeast Asia, including its geopolitics, security, and integration in Pacific Asia, with particular emphasis on shifting power trends in the region. As a U.S. State Department Pickering Fellow, Alex will enter the Foreign Service upon graduation.

Back to the 2012 SAIS U.S.-Korea Yearbook.