Eunjung Lim
Lecturer

Education:

Ph.D. Johns Hopkins, SAIS; M.I.A. Columbia University; B.A. University of Tokyo

Expertise:
South Korean and Japanese political economy; comparative politics; energy security polices of East Asian countries

Background:

Eunjung Lim is a lecturer of Korea Studies at Johns Hopkins SAIS. Her areas of specialization are South Korean and Japanese political economy, comparative politics, and energy security policies of East Asian countries. She has been a researcher and visiting fellow at several institutes including the Center for Contemporary Korean Studies at Interfaculty Initiative in Information Studies at the University of Tokyo, the Institute of Japanese Studies at Seoul National University, the Institute of Japan Studies at Kookmin University, and Institute of Energy Economics, Japan. Before joining SAIS faculty, Eunjung Lim taught at several universities in Korea, including Yonsei University and Korea University.  She earned a B.A. from the University of Tokyo, an M.I.A. from Columbia University and a Ph.D from Johns Hopkins University, SAIS. She is fluent in Korean, Japanese and English.

Publications:

“Japan in the Period of Rapid Economic Growth and Fukushima: Analysis on Domestic Political Economy behind ‘Embracing’ Nuclear Energy (고도성장기 일본, 그리고 후쿠시마(福島): 원자력 도입을 둘러싼 정치경제에 대한 고찰)” for The Korean Journal for Japanese Studies Vol. 39. (June 2014): 61-87. In Korean.

“Whither the Japan’s Nuclear Fuel Cycle Policy after Fukushima?: Analysis Based on the Case of Rokkasho Village, Aomori Prefecture (일본의 포스트 후쿠시마 핵연료주기정책의 향방에 관한 연구 – 아오모리현 롯카쇼무라 개발역사를 통한 진단)” for The Korean Journal for Japanese Studies Vol. 36. (December 2012): 57-83. In Korean.

“Who is the Strongest in Washington D.C.?: A Comparative Study on the Korean-American Comfort Women Movement and the Japanese-American Redress Movement” for International Studies Review Vol.12. No.2. (December 2011): 95-115.

Working Papers:

“South Korea’s Middle Power Role in the Northeast Asian Gas Cooperation”

“Multilateral Approach to the Back End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle in Asia-Pacific?”